scharrison's blog

Tuesday Twitter roundup

It's nothing short of infuriating. Teachers and their advocates have been purchasing basic education supplies out of their pockets for years, but most parents don't bat an eye. Meanwhile BergerMoore is throwing another $100 million at private school vouchers. Grrr...

Weekend Wound-Up: Deep dive version

Before you roll your eyes and bounce, I won't be the deep diver. Not that I can't do it, I'm just prone to being distracted by undulating aquatic plant life and colorful fish (Yes, that's the plural of fish, regardless of what Merriam Webster or the Associated Press say. Jesus fed them loaves and fish. And one guy who normally fishes for his dinner was greatly relieved he could skip it that day).

Our deep divers in this diary are professionals, and incredibly intelligent and resourceful ones. We'll start off with our good friends working their respective beats at the NC Justice Center:

How many "smoking guns" do we fricking need?

I'ma let Rob Schofield take the wheel while I talk Evil Steve down from his precarious perch:

As noted in States Newsroom reporter Jacob Fischler’s remarkable and detailed report, the sworn testimony of a top aide to Trump’s former chief of staff — North Carolina’s own Mark Meadows — made clear that, among other things, Trump became completely unhinged on the day of the insurrection. According to Cassidy Hutchinson’s riveting and compelling testimony, Trump even went so far as to: urge the admission of armed attendees to his infamous pre-insurrection speech, defend demonstrators calling for the assassination of Vice President Mike Pence, and physically assault a Secret Service agent in a bizarre attempt to commandeer the presidential limousine.

Repeatedly, Hutchinson’s sworn testimony made clear that, if he wasn’t already, Donald Trump became a raving and dangerous maniac on January 6, 2021 and played a key role in instigating and sustaining a deadly assault on democratic government that was one of the worst events in American history.

Donald Trump has broken so many laws it's impossible to list them all. Many of them were money-related (fraud & tax evasion), some were textbook RICO violations (threatening Georgia's Sec State to "find" votes), and some were crimes against our very nation (seditious conspiracy, treason, etc.). And it didn't take Hercule Poirot to figure that shit out, either. His guilt is obvious, even to the slowest of the slow. It's time for indictments. I'm not confident a jury will find him guilty, because 30% of our population is bat-shit crazy. But it needs to happen anyway.

SCOTUS overturns Roe v. Wade

Will NC be the first stop on a new underground railroad?

Its impact will spread far beyond Mississippi’s 15-week abortion law. By renouncing Roe and Casey (and decades of other abortion cases that relied on those decisions), the decision permits states to implement far more restrictive abortion laws. Mississippi itself has indicated that it will enforce a different state law, passed in 2007, that prohibits virtually all abortions, except to save the life of the mother or in cases involving rape. A dozen other states have passed similar legislation, known as “trigger laws” because they were drafted to go into effect if Roe and Casey were overturned. An analysis by the Guttmacher Institute predicts that 26 states are likely to ban all or nearly all abortions.

By now everybody reading this is already aware of the Court's ruling. While the anger and frustration will be with us for a long time, we need to start looking at practical measures, strategic measures, that will provide as much assistance to women as possible. As you can see from the map, North Carolina (and Virginia) will soon be the Southeast's only option for women seeking an abortion. But many of them are going to need help accessing that right:

Budd, Tillis, and Burr vote against veterans exposed to toxins

And their actions speak volumes:

Sens. Thom Tillis and Richard Burr voted Thursday against the bill they helped craft that would benefit veterans from Camp Lejeune who were exposed to toxic chemicals in the base’s water for nearly three decades. A version of this bill did pass the House 256-174 in March, with mixed results from North Carolina’s 13 representatives. Reps. David Rouzer, Patrick McHenry, Madison Cawthorn, Dan Bishop, Ted Budd and Virginia Foxx, all Republicans, voted against the bill.

The Honoring our PACT Act of 2021 would provide health care through the Department of Veteran Affairs to veterans exposed to toxic substances, ensures veterans aren’t forced to prove their exposure before receiving care and makes improvements to the department’s process for receiving care for exposure.

This subject is not new to BlueNC readers; it's been on our radar for over 12 years. Understand, this bill doesn't "give away" a bunch of taxpayers' dollars, it merely provides health care treatment for military and civilians recklessly exposed to toxic chemicals while working for the DoD. And big surprise: that is expensive. It's also not surprising the VA's budget has grown exponentially over the last twenty years thanks to our wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. $300 Billion and rising. But pay attention to Randall Stagner in this clip:

Tuesday Twitter roundup

I haven't read the whole thing, but I'm on the "Yes" side after seeing several people I respect (including Chief Justice Beasley) give it a thumb's up.

Tuesday Twitter roundup

We shouldn't have to file a complaint with law enforcement when somebody says this crap on national TV. The days of assuming people don't really mean what they say are over. Haul his ass in for questioning.

Tuesday Twitter roundup

She is not wrong. It's also important to remember the Continental Congress continually struggled with funding for the War, and many delegates went into debt to provision troops. It was a different time, and should be viewed in that context. Speaking of:

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